HOW TO USE THE PSYCHOLOGY OF 8 COLOURS FOR PACKAGING OF YOUR PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

PCKThe above subject matter  is  structured as a lecture, with a goal to educate and enrich your knowledge base,  so you will do well to read to the end to get the full details and contact me for clarity where necessary.

in 2015, Someone said to me, ” packaging is key to succeed in Africa as a startup or emerging brand”,

Really? Well, I like to agree that packaging is important, however, it is very important that you know what packaging is about and do it right.

Basically, Packaging is the technology of enclosing or protecting and presenting products and services for distribution, storage, sale, and use, it also involves the process of designing, evaluating, and producing packages. However, there are certain factors that can mess up or convey the right impression about your products and services, the colour of your packaged product is absolutely important, that is why i choose to share the psychology of 8 colours.

colours are important because the communicate and  relate respectively to the body, the mind, the emotions  as well as the essential balance between these three. The psychological properties of our basic colours are as follows.

•RED. Physical Positive: Physical courage, strength, warmth, energy, basic survival, ‘fight or flight’, stimulation, masculinity, excitement. Negative: Defiance, aggression, visual impact, strain. Being the longest wavelength, red is a powerful colour. Although not technically the most visible, it has the property of appearing to be nearer than it is and therefore it grabs our attention first. Hence its effectiveness in traffic lights the world over. Its effect is physical; it stimulates us and raises the pulse rate, giving the impression that time is passing faster than it is. It relates to the masculine principle and can activate the “fight or flight” instinct. Red is strong, and very basic. Pure red is the simplest colour, with no subtlety. It is stimulating and lively, very friendly. At the same time, it can be perceived as demanding and aggressive.

BLUE. Intellectual. Positive: Intelligence, communication, trust, efficiency, serenity, duty, logic, coolness, reflection, calm. Negative: Coldness, aloofness, lack of emotion, unfriendliness. Blue is the colour of the mind and is essentially soothing; it affects us mentally, rather than the physical reaction we have to red. Strong blues will stimulate clear thought and lighter, soft blues will calm the mind and aid concentration. Consequently it is serene and mentally calming. It is the colour of clear communication. Blue objects do not appear to be as close to us as red ones. Time and again in research, blue is the world’s favourite colour. However, it can be perceived as cold, unemotional and unfriendly.

YELLOW. Emotional Positive: Optimism, confidence, self-esteem, extraversion, emotional strength, friendliness, creativity. Negative: Irrationality, fear, emotional fragility, depression, anxiety, suicide.The yellow wavelength is relatively long and essentially stimulating. In this case the stimulus is emotional, therefore yellow is the strongest colour, psychologically. The right yellow will lift our spirits and our self-esteem; it is the colour of confidence and optimism. Too much of it, or the wrong tone in relation to the other tones in a colour scheme, can cause self-esteem to plummet, giving rise to fear and anxiety. Our “yellow streak” can surface.

GREEN. Balance Positive: Harmony, balance, refreshment, universal love, rest, restoration, reassurance, environmental awareness, equilibrium, peace. Negative: Boredom, stagnation, blandness, enervation. Green strikes the eye in such a way as to require no adjustment whatever and is, therefore, restful. Being in the Centre of the spectrum, it is the colour of balance – a more important concept than many people realise. When the world about us contains plenty of green, this indicates the presence of water, and little danger of famine, so we are reassured by green, on a primitive level. Negatively, it can indicate stagnation and, incorrectly used, will be perceived as being too bland.

• VIOLET. Spiritual Positive: Spiritual awareness, containment, vision, luxury, authenticity, truth, quality. Negative: Introversion, decadence, suppression, inferiority. The shortest wavelength is violet, often described as purple. It takes awareness to a higher level of thought, even into the realms of spiritual values. It is highly introversive and encourages deep contemplation, or meditation. It has associations with royalty and usually communicates the finest possible quality. Being the last visible wavelength before the ultra-violet ray, it has associations with time and space and the cosmos. Excessive use of purple can bring about too much introspection and the wrong tone of it communicates something cheap and nasty, faster than any other colour.

ORANGE. Positive: Physical comfort, food, warmth, security, sensuality, passion, abundance, fun. Negative: Deprivation, frustration, frivolity, immaturity. Since it is a combination of red and yellow, orange is stimulating and reaction to it is a combination of the physical and the emotional. It focuses our minds on issues of physical comfort – food, warmth, shelter etc. – and sensuality. It is a ‘fun’ colour. Negatively, it might focus on the exact opposite – deprivation. This is particularly likely when warm orange is used with black. Equally, too much orange suggests frivolity and a lack of serious intellectual values.

PINK. Positive: Physical tranquility, nurture, warmth, femininity, love, sexuality, survival of the species. Negative: Inhibition, emotional claustrophobia, emasculation, physical weakness. Being a tint of red, pink also affects us physically, but it soothes, rather than stimulates. (Interestingly, red is the only colour that has an entirely separate name for its tints. Tints of blue, green, yellow, etc. are simply called light blue, light green etc.) Pink is a powerful colour, psychologically. It represents the feminine principle, and survival of the species; it is nurturing and physically soothing. Too much pink is physically draining and can be somewhat emasculating.

GREY. Positive: Psychological neutrality. Negative: Lack of confidence, dampness, depression, hibernation, lack of energy. Pure grey is the only colour that has no direct psychological properties. It is, however, quite suppressible. A virtual absence of colour is depressing and when the world turns grey we are instinctively conditioned to draw in and prepare for hibernation. Unless the precise tone is right, grey has a dampening effect on other colours used with it. Heavy use of grey usually indicates a lack of confidence and fear of exposure.

• BLACK. Positive: Sophistication, glamour, security, emotional safety, efficiency, substance. Negative: Oppression, coldness, menace, heaviness. Black is all colours, totally absorbed. The psychological implications of that are considerable. It creates protective barriers, as it absorbs all the energy coming towards you, and it enshrouds the personality. Black is essentially an absence of light, since no wavelengths are reflected and it can, therefore be menacing; many people are afraid of the dark. Positively, it communicates absolute clarity, with no fine nuances. It communicates sophistication and uncompromising excellence and it works particularly well with white. Black creates a perception of weight and seriousness. It is a myth that black clothes are slimming:

Whether you’re wondering what color to paint the office, or you’re looking to get a packaging bag for your products etc, the colors you choose can increase your chance of reaching your goals. Color greatly influences human emotion and behavior. If you’re hoping to make your workers more productive, or you want to encourage shoppers to spend money, understanding the basics of colour psychology can help you maximize your potential.

Color wields influence on our attitudes and emotions.i Read recently When our eyes take in a color, they communicate with a region of the brain known as the hypothalamus, which in turn sends a cascade of signals to the pituitary gland, on to the endocrine system, and then to the thyroid glands. The thyroid glands signal the release of hormones, which cause fluctuation in mood, emotion, and resulting behavior.

So, the bottom line is: use the right colors, and you win.

The Psychology of colour is the science of how colour affects human behavior. There are key facts of colour theory that are indisputable. Let’s get oriented to our context. Since colour is attractive and conveys a message, we need to understand where you should use these colour tips.
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Colour combination is a tricky thing. You have to use it in the right way, at the right time, with the right audience, and for the right purpose. For example, if you are selling chocolate in a red or purple pack is an effort in futility.

I‘ll explain all the tricks below. In order to succeed at using the right colour for packaging your products and services. However don’t forget that you need to follow these core principles:
The right way,    The right time,   The right audience,    The right purpose

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1. Women don’t like gray, orange, and brown. They like blue, purple, and green.

Hmmmm, do you agree? The sociological differences between color preferences are a whole branch of study unto itself. Most people think that the universally-loved female color is pink. It‘s not. Just a small percentage of women choose pink as their favorite color. Thus, while pink may suggest femininity in the psychology of colour, this doesn‘t mean that pink is appealing to all women, or even most women. Use colors other than pink — like blue, purple, and green — and you may improve the appeal of your products if your targeting women,

 

2. Men don’t like purple, orange, and brown. Men like blue, green, and black.

If you‘re marketing to men, these are the colors to stay away from: purple, orange, and brown. Instead, use blue, green, and black. These colors — blue, green, and black — are traditionally associated with maleness. However, it comes as a slight surprise to some that brown isn‘t a favorite pick.

3. Use blue in order to cultivate Build trust.

Blue is one of the most-used colors, with good reason. A lot of people like blue.
Read the literature on blue, and you‘ll come across messages like
• The color blue is a color of trust, peace, order, and loyalty,
• Blue is a corporate colour indicating believe and trust , it reflects confidence and intelligence.
• Blue calls to mind feelings of calmness and serenity. It often is described as peaceful, tranquil, secure, and orderly.

There is wide agreement in the research community on the psychological effects of the color blue. Its subtle message of trustworthiness and serenity is true. You can use this to your advantage on when designing packaging for service based business

For example,The world‘s biggest social network is blue. For a company whose core values are transparency and trust, this probably is not an accident.

A company that serves as a conduit for billions of dollars, PayPal, also prefers the color blue. Chances are, this helps to improve their trustworthiness. If they were to try, say, red or orange as the theme color and branding, they probably wouldn‘t have the same level of conversion.

4. Yellow is for warnings.

Yellow is a color of warning. Hence, the color yellow is used for warning signs, traffic signals, and wet floor signs. It seems odd, then, that some color psychologists declare yellow to be the color of happiness. Business Insider reports that ―brands use yellow to show that they‘re fun and friendly.‖ There is a chance that yellow can suggest playfulness. However, since yellow stimulates the brain‘s excitement center, the playfulness feeling may be simply a state of heightened emotion and response, not exactly sheer joy.
The psychology of colour is closely tied to memories and experiences. So, if someone had a very pleasant experience with someone wearing a yellow shirt, eating at a fast food establishment with yellow arches, or living in a home with yellow walls, then the yellow color may cause joy by memory association.
I‘ve even read that ―the color yellow can cause nausea,although I‘m doubtful about this.
If you find the study about cranky babies and angry people living in yellow-walled houses, please let me know. I‘m pretty sure that babies are going to cry and people are going to get ticked, regardless of the paint color. Whatever the case, it does seem true that ―yellow activates the anxiety center of the brain, Use yellow in small doses unless you want to cause unnecessary anxiety.

5. Green is ideal for environmental and outdoor products.

Perhaps the most intuitive color connection is green — the color of outdoors, eco-friendly, nature, and the environment. Green essentially is a chromatic symbol for nature itself.
Apart from its fairly obvious outdoorsy suggestiveness, green also is a color that can improve creativity. Labeled ―the green effect,‖ one study indicated that participants had more bursts of creativity when presented with a flash of green color as opposed to any other color.
If the focus of your product or service has anything to do with nature, environment, organic, or outdoors, green should be your color of choice.
Green isn‘t just about nature, the word ―green‖ itself is a buzzword for environmental awareness and appreciation. Using the word and the color itself can lend an environmental aura to your products or services, improving your reputation among those who are passionate about environmental concerns.

6. Orange is a fun color that can create a sense of haste or impulse.

The positive side of orange is that it can be used as the ―fun color. orange helps to stimulate physical activity, competition, and confidence. This may be why orange is used heavily by sports teams and children‘s products.In fact,  the color suggests urgency, which makes the message more noticeable and actionable.
It makes sense. Orange means active. Orange means fun. Orange means togetherness. Because it‘s a loud and warm color. However, orange can be slightly overwhelming. An article on Psych.Answers.com advises, ―Orange will be used sparingly to bring your attention to something, but not so much as to overwhelm the actual message of the advert.

7. Black adds a sense of luxury and value.

The darker the tone, the more lux it is, says our internal color psychology. In a Business Insider piece on color and branding, the author relates the significance of black. Black can also be seen as a luxurious color. Black, when used correctly can communicate glamour, sophistication, exclusivity.If you are selling high-value luxury consumer items, black probably would be a good choice.

 

8. Don’t neglect white.

In most of the color psychology material I read, there is a forgotten feature. Maybe that‘s because color theorists can‘t agree on whether white is a color or not. I don‘t really care whether it is or not. What I do know is that use of white space is a powerful design feature. Take, for example, the most popular website in the world. It‘s basically all white:
White is often forgotten, because its primary use is as a background color. Most well-designed websites today use plenty of white space in order to create a sense of freedom, spaciousness, and breath ability.

for more information and guidance for brand communication and integrating this information , feel free to interact with me, and dont forget that Every Business needs a checkup.

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